Browse Submitted Place Names

This is a list of submitted place names in which the person who added the name is McLeeds.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AE   (Settlement & River)   Scottish, Scots
The name of a village and a stream in Southwest Scotland. The name seems to be derived from Old Norse á, meaning 'river'.
ASKRIGG   (Settlement)   English
A village in rural Northeast England. It is derived from the Old Norse askr, 'ash tree' (c.f Swedish ask, 'ash tree') and hryggr, 'ridge' (c.f Swedish rygg, 'ridge, spine', German rücken, 'spine', Scots rig, 'ridge').
BATHGATE   (Settlement)   Scottish
A town in West Lothian, Scotland. It is derived from the Cumbric beith, meaning 'boar' (Welsh baedd) and chyd, meaning 'wood, trees' (Welsh coed).
BEDDGELERT   (Settlement)   Welsh
A village in northwest Wales. The name means 'Gelert's grave', from Welsh bedd, 'grave' & Gelert, whose identity is a subject of debate.... [more]
BETWS-Y-COED   (Settlement)   Welsh
A village in rural North-West Wales. The element betws, in Welsh means 'prayer house'. The y is the definite article 'the'. The final element coed means 'trees'. This gives a full name meaning 'prayer house in the forest'... [more]
BIRMINGHAM   (Settlement)   English
A city in central England. Its name derives from the Anglo-Saxon words meaning 'the farm of Beormund's people', from the personal name Beormund, ingas, meaning 'people' and ham, meaning 'farm'.
BLACKPOOL   (Settlement)   English
A coastal town in Lancashire. Literally means 'black pool', so named from a nearby drainage stream which ran through a peat bog, discharging discoloured water into the nearby Irish Sea. (Compare Dublin).
BONNYRIGG   (Settlement)   Scottish
A town, near Edinburgh, Scotland. It derives from Lowland Scots bonnie, meaning 'beautiful, fine', and rig, meaning 'ridge, hill-crest' (Old Norse hryggr, 'back, ridge', Dutch rug, 'ridge').
BROADFORD   (Settlement)   Scottish
A village in Skye, Scotland. It's name derives from the Old Norse words for 'wide fjord', referencing the local geography.... [more]
BUCHANAN   (Political Subdivision)   Scottish
A parish of Stirlingshire, Scotland. It's name derives from the Gaelic buth 'house, shed' and chanain 'canon', thus meaning 'house of the canon'.
CARDIFF   (Settlement)   Welsh
The capital city of Wales. Cardiff derives from the city's Welsh name Caerdydd, which in turn was derived from the city's Old Welsh name Caerdyf (In Welsh f (v) is often mutated to dd (th)).... [more]
CARPERBY   (Settlement)   English
A village in Yorkshire, England. The second element is Old Norse -byr, 'farm'. The first element is possibly the Old Gaelic personal name Cairpre. This seems to indicate a farm of an Irish or Scottish Viking, who settled in England... [more]
CHEVIOT   (Mountain)   English
The name of a mountain and the surrounding mountains on the Anglo-Scottish border. The name is thought to be Celtic and to derive from Brythonic *ceμ-, *cejn 'ridge, spine' (Welsh chefn, 'back, ridge'), and -ed, which might have meant 'having the quality of-'.
COQUET   (River)   English
A river in Northumberland, England. Its name originates from words of a local Brythonic-Celtic language, equivalent to the Welsh coched, meaning 'red, brown'.
CRAWFORDJOHN   (Settlement)   Scottish
A village in Southern Scotland. It's name is of Scots origin and means 'Crow's ford of John'. See Crawford.
CUMBERLAND   (Region)   English
A historical English county, covering the Northern half of modern-day Cumbria. It derives from the Brythonic combrogi, meaning 'fellow-countrymen'.
CUMBERNAULD   (Settlement)   Scottish
A town in North Lanarkshire, Scotland. The name in its present form is most likely derived from Gaelic comar nan allt meaning 'meeting of the waters'. However, early forms containing Cumyr- hint at a Cumbric predecessor derived possibly from Common Brittonic *cömber-ïn-alt (Welsh cymer-yn-allt), perhaps meaning 'confluence at the hill'.
DALKEITH   (Settlement)   Scottish
A small town in Midlothian, Scotland, south of Edinburgh. It is of Cumbric language origin. The first element is dal, meaning 'meadow, plateau' (Welsh ddôl) and chyd, meaning 'trees, wood' (Welsh coed).
DONCASTER   (Settlement)   English
A town in England located on the River Don. The first element is from the Roman fort Danum, likely from an earlier Celtic settlement relating to the River Don. The second element is the Old English ceaster, 'fort' (c.f Modern English castle).
DURHAM   (Settlement & Region)   English, Anglo-Norman
A cathedral city in the North-East of England. The name is derived from the city's Latin name Dunelm, which comprises of the Celtic element dun, 'fortress' (c.f Welsh dinas, 'city') and the Old Norse holme, which meant an island (referring to the peninsular formed by the River Wear).
ECCLEFECHAN   (Settlement)   Scottish
A village in South-West Scotland. It's name derives from the Cumbric eccle-, meaning 'church' (Welsh eglwys) and fechan, which meant 'small, unimportant' (Welsh fychan).
EDEN   (River)   English
The name of a river in Cumbria, England. It derives from the Brythonic *ituna, 'to gush forth'.
EDINBURGH   (Settlement)   Scottish
Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland. It was first attested in the Cumbric form Dinn Eidyn, meaning 'castle of Edin', hence the Gaelic name Dùn Èideann.... [more]
ESSEX   (Region)   English
A county in South-Eastern England. The name means 'East Saxons'. The Saxons were a Germanic tribe which settled in Britain in the 5th century A.D.
GATESHEAD   (Settlement)   English
A town in Northeast England. It most likely means 'goat's headland', implying that wild goats were a part of the local fauna.
GOLSPIE   (Settlement)   Scottish
A village in Sutherland, Scotland. It is derived from the Old Norse *gol, 'gully' and byr, 'village'.
HACKNEY   (Settlement)   English
A district of London. It possibly derives from Old English Haka’s ey, meaning 'Haka's Island'.
HELMSLEY   (Settlement)   English
A small market town in Northern England. It's name derives from the Old English Helm, a personal name and leah, which means 'clearing, field'.
INVERNESS   (Settlement)   Scottish
A coastal city in northern Scotland. From Scottish Gaelic Inbhir, meaning 'estuary, confluence'and nis, the Gaelic name of the River Ness.
KEITH   (Settlement)   Scottish
A small town in Moray, North-East Scotland. It's name is derived from a Pictish word kit, which meant 'forest' (Welsh coed, 'wood').
KENT   (Region)   English, Ancient Celtic
A county in South-East England. Derived from Ancient Celtic Cantus, 'border, rim', cognate with Welsh cant, 'periphery'.
KIELDER   (River)   English
A river and reservoir in Northern England. It's name could come from Celtic words cognate with Welsh clou, 'fast' and dwr 'river'.
KIRKCUDBRIGHT   (Settlement)   Scottish
Coastal town in South-West England. It derives from Scots language words meaning 'Church of St. Cuthbert'.
KIRKWALL   (Settlement)   Scottish
A town in the Orkney Islands, Scotland. It's name is derived from Old Norse Kirkjuvagr, meaning 'church bay'.
LAMPERT   (Settlement)   English
A tiny hamlet in Northumberland, near the border with Cumbria. Despite this location's small size, several theories have emerged relating to the etymology of this unique name, which was first recorded in c.1290 as Lythel Lampard.... [more]
LANARK   (Settlement)   Scottish
A small town in Lanarkshire, Central Scotland. It's name is of Cumbric origin and is thought to be equivalent with Welsh llanerch, 'open space in a forest'.
LEEDS   (Settlement)   Celtic
Leeds is a city in West Yorkshire, England. It derives it's name from a Brythonic term Ladenses, meaning 'people of the fast-flowing river'. This word likely has some cognacy with the Modern Welsh llaesed, 'flowing' and possibly llaith, 'wet'... [more]
LEITH   (Settlement & River)   Scottish, Medieval Scottish
The name of a river (Water of Leith) and the settlement at it's mouth, near Edinburgh, Scotland. The name is likely of Cumbric origin and is likely cognate with the Welsh word laith, meaning 'damp, moist'.
LIVERPOOL   (Settlement)   English, Welsh
A port city in western England on the mouth of the River Mersey. Uncertain origin. Possibly derived from Cumbric words equivalent to the Welsh leidiau, meaning 'mud' and pwll, meaning 'pool', or else the Old English formation *Liferpōl, 'thick, muddy pool'.
LLANBERIS   (Settlement)   Welsh
A village in North Wales. The first element is Welsh llan, 'parish, church of-'. The second is a corruption of Peris, a 6th century Welsh saint.
LOCKERBIE   (Settlement)   Scottish
A small town in Southern Scotland. It derives from the personal name Lockhard and the Old Norse suffix -by, meaning 'town'. ... [more]
MANCHESTER   (Settlement)   English
A large city in North-West England. Manchester is an Anglicization of the town's Latin name Mancunium. This was likely derived from an earlier name in a language similar to Welsh. It may have derived from words equivalent to Welsh mamau, meaning 'mother', in reference to a local river goddess... [more]
NENT   (River)   English
A river in the North Pennines. Its name is derived from Cumbric nent, meaning 'stream'. It is a tributary of the Tyne.
NEWCASTLE   (Settlement)   English
A city in North-East England. It simply denoted the site of a New Castle, as this is where a castle was erected by William the Conquer in 1080.... [more]
NORTHUMBERLAND   (Region)   English
From the much larger Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria, meaning 'land north of the Humber'.
PENGE   (Settlement)   English
A suburb of London, England. Originally named Penceat, it appears to derive from Brythonic *penno, 'head, edge' and *ceid, 'forest, wood', so likely meant 'settlement on the forest's edge'.
PENRITH   (Settlement)   English
A town in Northern England. Its name derives from the Cumbric pen, 'hill, top, summit' (Welsh pen) and rith, 'ford, crossing', (Welsh ryd).
PENSHAW   (Settlement)   English
A village in Northern England. The first element seems to be Cumbric pen, which means 'summit, head'. The most obvious explanation for the second is Old English sceaga, meaning 'woods'... [more]
PEN-Y-GHENT   (Mountain)   English, Ancient Celtic
A mountain in Yorkshire, Northern England. In the Cumbric Language, the element pen, exactly as in Welsh, meant 'head, top, summit', and y, also as in Welsh, meant the definite article 'the'... [more]
PERSLEY   (Settlement)   Scottish
A small hamlet in North-East Scotland, now encompassed by the city of Aberdeen. There are several explanations as to the origin of the name of this small settlement:... [more]
PERTH   (Settlement)   Scottish
A city in central Scotland. The name is of Pictish origin and derived from *perth, meaning 'bush, copse' (Welsh perth, 'bush, hedge').
PONTEFRACT   (Settlement)   English
From Latin ponte fracto, meaning 'broken bridge'.
SEDBERGH   (Settlement)   English
A small town in rural Northern England. Its name derives from Old Norse sed, meaning 'sand' and berg, meaning 'mountain', referring to the mountainous location of Sedbergh and possibly the sandstone hills.
STIRLING   (Settlement)   Scottish
A city in Central Scotland. The exact origin is unknown. However, given the town's fame, several theories have emerged:... [more]
STRANRAER   (Settlement)   Scottish
A port town in South-West Scotland. Its name derives from Gaelic An t-Sròn Reamhar, literally meaning 'the fat nose', but which more prosaically might be rendered as 'the broad headland', referring to the local geography.
SUNDERLAND   (Settlement)   English
A port city in North-East England. Derives from Old English sundor, 'separate' (c.f German sondern, 'but, instead') and land, 'land'.
TEES   (River)   English
A river in Northeast England. The precise origin of name is not known for sure. But, given that it is one of Britain's major rivers, several theories have emerged:... [more]
THAMES   (River)   English
The name of the river in southern England on which London is situated. This is a Brythonic river-name, explained as a derivative of Common Brythonic *temēlos, 'darkness' (compare Old Welsh timuil, 'darkness').
TRANENT   (Settlement)   Scottish
A town in East Lothian, east of Edinburgh, Scotland. It's name derives from the Brythonic-Celtic *traf-, meaning 'town, village' (Welsh treff) and *-neint, meaning 'stream, small river' (Welsh nant).
TREDEGAR   (Settlement)   Welsh
A town in South-East Wales. Its name derives from the Old Welsh tref, which means 'town' or traditionally 'farm, estate', and degewr, which meant 'ten acres'.
TYNE   (River)   English
A river in North-East England. Its meaning is unknown, but some sources relate it to a word in a local Celtic or pre-Celtic language *tei-*, meaning 'river'. However, the evidence for the existence of such a word is insufficient.... [more]
WALES   (Country)   English, Wales
A country in Europe and a part of the United Kingdom. Its name derives from the Old English Wælisc, meaning 'foreigner, Welshman'. ... [more]
WALTON   (Settlement)   English
The name of several villages in England, particularly Lancashire. Named from Old English wale, meaning 'Celt, foreigner' (Compare Wales) and tun, meaning 'town, village'.
WATERFORD   (Settlement)   Irish
A city in Southern Ireland. Its name derives from Old Norse veðra, 'ram' (Swedish vädur, 'ram', See Wetherby) and fjord, 'fjord'.
WEAR   (River)   English
A river in North-East England. It is taken to be of Old Celtic origin and meant 'blood-colored water', referring to the reddish-brown color of the river. In modern Welsh, the name would be waed dwr, 'blood water'... [more]
WETHERBY   (Settlement)   English
A town in West Yorkshire. It's name derives from Old Norse veðra, 'ram' (Swedish vadur, Norwegian vær) and byr, 'farm'. See Waterford.
WIGAN   (Settlement)   English
A town in Northern England. Its etymology is uncertain but several have been suggested:... [more]
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