XxproudrulerxX's Personal Name List

Adrasteia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀδράστεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-DRAS-TEH-A(Classical Greek)
Rating: 70% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Adrastos. In Greek mythology this name was borne by a nymph who fostered the infant Zeus. This was also another name of the goddess Nemesis.
Adriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Slovak, Czech, Bulgarian, English, Dutch
Other Scripts: Адриана(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: a-dree-A-na(Italian, Dutch) a-DHRYA-na(Spanish) a-DRYA-na(Polish) ay-dree-AN-ə(English)
Rating: 62% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Adrian. A famous bearer is the Brazilian model Adriana Lima (1981-).
Aelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: IE-lee-a
Rating: 27% based on 6 votes
Feminine form of Aelius.
Aeliana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
Feminine form of Aelianus.
Aenor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Rating: 38% based on 5 votes
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name of unknown meaning. This was the name of the mother of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
Aerona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 52% based on 5 votes
Variant of Aeron.
Ailís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AY-leesh
Rating: 44% based on 5 votes
Irish form of Alice.
Alaia 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Means "joyful, happy" from Basque alai.
Aliénor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LYEH-NAWR
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
French form of Eleanor.
Allegra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Rare)
Pronounced: al-LEH-gra(Italian) ə-LEHG-rə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron (1817-1822).
Amalthea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀμάλθεια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: am-əl-THEE-ə(English)
Rating: 77% based on 3 votes
From the Greek Ἀμάλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθάσσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a nymph (in some sources a goat) who nursed the infant Zeus.
Amarachi
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Western African, Igbo
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "God's grace" in Igbo.
Amaranta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Pronounced: a-ma-RAN-ta
Rating: 93% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Italian form of Amarantha.
Amarilis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Latin American)
Pronounced: a-ma-REE-lees
Rating: 83% based on 3 votes
Spanish form of Amaryllis.
Amaterasu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese Mythology
Other Scripts: 天照(Japanese Kanji) あまてらす(Japanese Hiragana)
Pronounced: A-MA-TEH-RA-SOO(Japanese)
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. She was born when Izanagi washed his left eye after returning from the underworld. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
Anahera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Means "angel" in Maori.
Anahita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Persian Mythology
Other Scripts: آناهیتا(Persian)
Pronounced: aw-naw-hee-TAW(Persian)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "immaculate, undefiled" from Avestan a "not" and ahit "unclean". This was the name of the Persian goddess of fertility and water. She was sometimes identified with Artemis, Aphrodite and Athena.
Andromeda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἀνδρομέδα, Ἀνδρομέδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-DRO-MEH-DA(Classical Greek) an-DRAH-mi-də(English)
Rating: 80% based on 4 votes
Derived from Greek ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός) combined with one of the related words μέδομαι (medomai) meaning "to be mindful of, to provide for" or μέδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek mythology Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess rescued from sacrifice by the hero Perseus. A constellation in the northern sky is named for her. This is also the name of a nearby galaxy, given because it resides (from our point of view) within the constellation.
Angélica
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ang-KHEH-lee-ka(Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Angelica.
Annika
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, German, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHN-nee-kah(Swedish, Dutch, Finnish) A-nee-ka(German) AN-i-kə(English) AHN-i-kə(English)
Rating: 73% based on 4 votes
Swedish diminutive of Anna.
Antonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian, Greek, Croatian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Αντωνία(Greek) Антония(Bulgarian)
Pronounced: an-TO-nya(Italian, Spanish, German) an-TO-nee-ə(English) ahn-TO-nee-a(Dutch)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Araceli
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-ra-THEH-lee(European Spanish) a-ra-SEH-lee(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "altar of the sky" from Latin ara "altar" and coeli "sky". This is an epithet of the Virgin Mary in her role as the patron saint of Lucena, Spain.
Aria 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AHR-ee-ə
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
Means "song, melody" in Italian (literally means "air"). An aria is an elaborate vocal solo, the type usually performed in operas. As an English name, it has only been in use since the 20th century, its rise in popularity accelerating after the 2010 premier of the television drama Pretty Little Liars, featuring a character by this name. It is not traditionally used in Italy.
Arianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English (Modern)
Pronounced: a-RYAN-na(Italian) ar-ee-AN-ə(English) ar-ee-AHN-ə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Italian form of Ariadne.
Arista
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: ə-RIS-tə(English)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Means "ear of grain" in Latin. This is the name of a star, also known as Spica, in the constellation Virgo.
Astarte
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Semitic Mythology (Hellenized), Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀστάρτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: as-TAHR-tee(English)
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Greek form of Ashtoreth.
Astra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-trə
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Means "star", ultimately from Greek ἀστήρ (aster). This name has only been (rarely) used since the 20th century.
Astraea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἀστραία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Latinized form of the Greek Ἀστραία (Astraia), derived from Greek ἀστήρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
Astrid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French, English
Pronounced: AS-trid(Swedish, English) AHS-tree(Norwegian) AS-trit(German) AS-TREED(French)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Modern Scandinavian form of Ástríðr. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of Pippi Longstocking. It was also borne by a Swedish princess (1905-1935) who became the queen of Belgium as the wife of Leopold III.
Asunción
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: a-soon-THYON(European Spanish) a-soon-SYON(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "assumption" in Spanish. This name is given in reference to the assumption of the Virgin Mary into heaven.
Athenais
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ἀθηναΐς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Ancient Greek personal name that was derived from the name of the Greek goddess Athena.
Aurélie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LEE
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of Aurelius.
Aurora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Pronounced: ow-RAW-ra(Italian) ow-RO-ra(Spanish, Latin) ə-RAWR-ə(English) OW-ro-rah(Finnish)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
Avra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Αύρα(Greek)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Greek form of Aura.
Axelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-KSEHL
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Axel.
Beatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Hungarian, Dutch, English, Late Roman
Pronounced: beh-A-triks(German) BEH-a-triks(German) BEH-aw-treeks(Hungarian) BEH-ya-triks(Dutch) BEE-ə-triks(English) BEE-triks(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator meaning "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed, happy". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.

In England the name became rare after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, more commonly in the spelling Beatrice. Famous bearers include the British author and illustrator Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), the creator of Peter Rabbit, and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands (1938-).

Caelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Caelius.
Caitria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Possibly a form of Caitríona.
Calanthe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-LAN-thee
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
From the name of a type of orchid, ultimately meaning "beautiful flower", derived from Greek καλός (kalos) meaning "beautiful" and ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower".
Calixta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Calixtus.
Calypso
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Καλυψώ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: kə-LIP-so(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From Greek Καλυψώ (Kalypso), which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλύπτω (kalypto) meaning "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
Carla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, English, German, Dutch
Pronounced: KAR-la(Italian, Spanish, German) KAHR-lə(English) KAHR-lah(Dutch)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Carlo, Carlos or Carl.
Carmen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English, Italian, French, Romanian, German
Pronounced: KAR-mehn(Spanish, Italian) KAHR-mən(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Medieval Spanish form of Carmel influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera Carmen (1875).
Cassia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KAS-see-a(Latin) KA-shə(English) KAS-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Cassius.
Caterina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Catalan
Pronounced: ka-teh-REE-na(Italian) kə-tə-REE-nə(Catalan)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian and Catalan form of Katherine.
Cearra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Ciara 2.
Céline
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-LEEN
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French feminine form of Caelinus. This name can also function as a short form of Marceline.
Chryseis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χρυσηΐς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KRUY-SEH-EES(Classical Greek) krie-SEE-is(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Patronymic derived from Chryses. In Greek legend she was the daughter of Chryses, a priest of Apollo. After she was taken prisoner by the Greeks besieging Troy, Apollo sent a plague into their camp, forcing the Greeks to release her.
Constanza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: kons-TAN-tha(European Spanish) kons-TAN-sa(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Constantia.
Coralie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: KAW-RA-LEE
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Either a French form of Koralia, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see Coral).
Cornelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: kawr-NEH-lya(German) kor-NEH-lya(Italian) kawr-NEH-lee-a(Dutch) kawr-NEE-lee-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Cornelius. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
Cosette
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Literature
Pronounced: KAW-ZEHT(French)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
Cressida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: KREHS-i-də(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Form of Criseida used by Shakespeare in his play Troilus and Cressida (1602).
Damaris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Δάμαρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DAM-ə-ris(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Probably means "calf, heifer, girl" from Greek δάμαλις (damalis). In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul.
Damayanti
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism
Other Scripts: दमयन्ती, दमयंती(Sanskrit)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "subduing" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the Mahabharata this is the name of a beautiful princess, the wife of Nala.
Danaë
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δανάη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DA-NA-EH(Classical Greek) DAN-ay-ee(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
From Δαναοί (Danaoi), a word used by Homer to designate the Greeks. In Greek mythology Danaë was the daughter of the Argive king Acrisius. It had been prophesized to her father that he would one day be killed by Danaë's son, so he attempted to keep his daughter childless. However, Zeus came to her in the form of a shower of gold, and she became the mother of Perseus. Eventually the prophecy was fulfilled and Perseus killed Acrisius, albeit accidentally.
Delfina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: dehl-FEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Delphina.
Divina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Philippines), English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Spanish divina or an elaboration of English divine, both meaning "divine, godlike".
Dolores
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: do-LO-rehs(Spanish) də-LAWR-is(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "sorrows", taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary María de los Dolores, meaning "Mary of Sorrows". It has been used in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in America during the 1920s and 30s.
Eilís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: IE-leesh
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Irish Gaelic form of Elizabeth (or sometimes of Alice).
Eithne
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: EH-nyə(Irish)
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
Possibly from Old Irish etne meaning "kernel, grain". In Irish mythology Eithne or Ethniu was a Fomorian and the mother of Lugh Lámfada. It was borne by several other legendary and historical figures, including a few early saints.
Ekaterina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian
Other Scripts: Екатерина(Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian)
Pronounced: yi-kə-tyi-RYEE-nə(Russian) i-kə-tyi-RYEE-nə(Russian)
Rating: 70% based on 3 votes
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of Katherine, and an alternate transcription of Russian Екатерина (see Yekaterina).
Elektra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἠλέκτρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EH-LEHK-TRA(Classical Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Greek form of Electra.
Elvira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Russian
Other Scripts: Эльвира(Russian)
Pronounced: ehl-BEE-ra(Spanish) ehl-VEE-ra(Italian)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera Don Giovanni (1787).
Enfys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: EHN-vis
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "rainbow" in Welsh. This name was first used in the 19th century.
Enya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EHN-yə(English)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Eris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἔρις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EHR-is(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Means "strife" in Greek. In Greek mythology Eris was the goddess of discord. She was the sister and companion of Ares.
Esmeralda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehz-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) izh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) ehz-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
Estera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Polish, Slovak, Romanian, Lithuanian
Pronounced: eh-STEH-ra(Polish)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Polish, Slovak, Romanian and Lithuanian form of Esther.
Etna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the name of an active volcano on the island of Sicily, Italy.
Eudora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὐδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: yoo-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "good gift" in Greek, from the elements εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a nymph, one of the Hyades, in Greek mythology.
Evangelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, English
Pronounced: eh-ban-kheh-LEE-na(Spanish) i-van-jə-LEE-nə(English)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Latinate form of Evangeline.
Eydís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Norse [1], Icelandic
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from the Old Norse elements ey "good fortune" or "island" and dís "goddess".
Fiammetta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: fyam-MEHT-ta
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Fiamma.
Freja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Swedish
Pronounced: FRIE-ah(Danish) FRAY-ah(Swedish)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Danish and Swedish form of Freya.
Gaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαῖα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the Greek word γαῖα (gaia), a parallel form of γῆ (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
Galadriel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: gə-LAD-ree-əl(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in the fictional language Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
Genesis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: JEHN-ə-sis
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "birth, origin" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
Gianna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Greek
Other Scripts: Γιάννα(Greek)
Pronounced: JAN-na(Italian) YA-na(Greek)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Italian short form of Giovanna and a Modern Greek variant of Ioanna.
Gisela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: GEE-zə-la(German) khee-SEH-la(Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of Giselle.
Gloria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, German
Pronounced: GLAWR-ee-ə(English) GLO-rya(Spanish) GLAW-rya(Italian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.

The name was introduced to the English-speaking world by E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel Gloria (1891) and George Bernard Shaw's play You Never Can Tell (1898), which both feature characters with a Portuguese background [1]. It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).

Guinevere
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar meaning "white phantom", ultimately from the old Celtic roots *windos meaning "fair, white, blessed" (modern Welsh gwen) and *sēbros meaning "phantom, magical being" [1]. In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

Hersilia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Meaning uncertain, perhaps related to Greek ἕρση (herse) meaning "dew". In Roman legend this was the name of a Sabine woman who became the wife of Romulus.
Idril
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "sparkle brilliance" in the fictional language Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Idril was the daughter of Turgon, the king of Gondolin. She escaped the destruction of that place with her husband Tuor and sailed with him into the west.
Ileana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Pronounced: ee-LYA-na(Romanian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Possibly a Romanian variant of Elena. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
Indira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Tamil
Other Scripts: इन्दिरा(Sanskrit) इन्दिरा, इंदिरा(Hindi) इंदिरा(Marathi) ಇಂದಿರಾ(Kannada) இந்திரா(Tamil)
Pronounced: IN-di-ra(Hindi)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).
Indrani
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: इन्द्राणी(Sanskrit) ইন্দ্রানী(Bengali) इन्द्राणी, इंद्राणी(Hindi)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "queen of Indra" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess of jealousy and beauty, a wife of Indra.
Iris
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Slovene, Greek
Other Scripts: Ἶρις(Ancient Greek) Ίρις(Greek)
Pronounced: IE-ris(English) EE-ris(German, Dutch) EE-rees(Finnish, Spanish, Catalan, Italian) EE-REES(French)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow, also serving as a messenger to the gods. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
Isaura
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ee-SOW-ra(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Late Latin name meaning "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.
Ixchel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mayan Mythology, Indigenous American, Mayan
Pronounced: eesh-CHEHL(Mayan)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "rainbow lady", from Classic Maya ix "lady" and chel "rainbow". Ixchel was a Maya goddess associated with the earth, jaguars, medicine and childbirth. She was often depicted with a snake in her hair and crossbones embroidered on her skirt.
Jael
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: יָעֵל(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-əl(English) JAYL(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name יָעֵל (Ya'el) meaning "ibex, mountain goat". This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to the wife of Heber the Kenite. After Sisera, the captain of the Canaanite army, was defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak he took refuge in Heber's tent. When he fell asleep Jael killed him by hammering a tent peg into his head.
Jordana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian, Serbian, English (Rare)
Other Scripts: Јордана(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: khor-DHA-na(Spanish) jawr-DAN-ə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Jordan.
Judita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian, Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: YOO-di-ta(Czech) YOO-dee-ta(Slovak)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Lithuanian, Czech and Slovak form of Judith.
Juventas
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Means "youth" in Latin. Juventas was the Roman goddess of youth, equivalent to the Greek goddess Hebe.
Kaia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Estonian
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Katarina or Katariina.
Kalea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hawaiian
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "joy, happiness" in Hawaiian.
Kara 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KAHR-ə, KEHR-ə, KAR-ə
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Variant of Cara.
Karla
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian
Pronounced: KAR-la(German, Czech)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
German, Scandinavian, Czech and Croatian feminine form of Charles.
Kateri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the Mohawk pronunciation of Katherine. This was the name adopted by the 17th-century Mohawk saint Tekakwitha upon her baptism.
Kiera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEER-ə(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Ciara 1.
Kleio
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Greek
Other Scripts: Κλειώ(Greek)
Pronounced: KLEH-AW(Classical Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek κλέος (kleos) meaning "glory". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of history and heroic poetry, one of the nine Muses. She was said to have introduced the alphabet to Greece.
Korë
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Κόρη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Ancient Greek Κόρη (see Kore).
Korina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Κορίνα(Greek)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Modern Greek form of Corinna.
Láilá
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Sami
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Sami variant form of Helga.
Laurelle
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: LAWR-əl
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Laurel.
Laverna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown. Laverna was the Roman goddess of thieves and thievery.
Lavinia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Romanian
Pronounced: lə-VIN-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, probably of Etruscan origin. In Roman legend Lavinia was the daughter of King Latinus, the wife of Aeneas, and the ancestor of the Roman people. According to the legend Aeneas named the town of Lavinium in honour of his wife.
Leanora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Short form of Eleanora.
Lestari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indonesian
Pronounced: lehs-TAH-ree
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "eternal, abiding" in Indonesian.
Ligeia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Λιγεία(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek λιγύς (ligys) meaning "clear-voiced, shrill, whistling". This was the name of one of the Sirens in Greek legend. It was also used by Edgar Allan Poe in his story Ligeia (1838).
Liora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Strictly feminine form of Lior.
Lorelei
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature, English
Pronounced: LAWR-ə-lie(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From German Loreley, the name of a rock headland on the Rhine River. It is of uncertain meaning, though the second element is probably old German ley meaning "rock" (of Celtic origin). German romantic poets and songwriters, beginning with Clemens Brentano in 1801, tell that a maiden named the Lorelei lives on the rock and lures boaters to their death with her song.

In the English-speaking world this name has been occasionally given since the early 20th century. It started rising in America after the variant Lorelai was used for the main character (and her daughter, nicknamed Rory) on the television series Gilmore Girls (2000-2007).

Lorena 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Pronounced: lo-REH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of Lorraine.
Luminița
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian
Pronounced: loo-mee-NEE-tsa
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "little light", derived from Romanian lumina "light" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Luna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, Spanish, Italian, English
Pronounced: LOO-na(Spanish, Italian) LOO-nə(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
Luzia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, German
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Portuguese and German form of Lucia.
Lyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
Mae
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MAY
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of May. A famous bearer was the American actress Mae West (1893-1980), whose birth name was Mary.
Maeve
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: MAYV(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. She and her husband Ailill fought against the Ulster king Conchobar and the hero Cúchulainn, as told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Mahalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Mahala.
Maialen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: MIE-a-lehn
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Magdalene.
Máire
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MAH-ryə, MA-ryə
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Irish form of Maria (see Mary). The form Muire is used to refer to the Virgin Mary.
Máirín
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: MAH-ryeen, MA-ryeen
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Irish diminutive of Mary.
Maricruz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Combination of María and Cruz.
Marina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Ancient Roman
Other Scripts: Μαρίνα(Greek) Марина(Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian) მარინა(Georgian)
Pronounced: ma-REE-na(Italian, Spanish, German) mə-REE-nə(Catalan) mə-REEN-ə(English) mu-RYEE-nə(Russian) MA-ri-na(Czech)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Marinus. This name was borne by a few early saints. This is also the name by which Saint Margaret of Antioch is known in the Eastern Orthodox Church.
Maris 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: MEHR-is, MAR-is
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "of the sea", taken from the Latin title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea".
Marisol
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-ree-SOL
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Combination of María and Sol 1 or Soledad. It also resembles Spanish mar y sol "sea and sun".
Maryam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bashkir, Tatar
Other Scripts: مريم(Arabic) مریم(Persian, Urdu) Мәрйәм(Bashkir) Мәрьям(Tatar)
Pronounced: MAR-yam(Arabic)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Bashkir and Tatar form of Miryam (see Mary). In Iran it is also the name of a flower, the tuberose, which is named after the Virgin Mary.
Maura 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Pronounced: MOW-ra(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Maurus.
Maya 3
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מַיָּה(Hebrew)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from Hebrew מַיִם (mayim) meaning "water".
Meiriona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Meirion.
Mercedes
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: mehr-THEH-dhehs(European Spanish) mehr-SEH-dhehs(Latin American Spanish) mər-SAY-deez(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "mercies" (that is, the plural of mercy), from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary, María de las Mercedes, meaning "Mary of Mercies". It is ultimately from the Latin word merces meaning "wages, reward", which in Vulgar Latin acquired the meaning "favour, pity" [1].
Meritxell
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: mə-ree-CHEHL
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the name of a village in Andorra where there is a sanctuary dedicated to the Virgin Mary. The name of the village may derive from Latin meridies meaning "midday".
Micaela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: mee-ka-EH-la(Spanish)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Michael.
Minerva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology, English, Spanish
Pronounced: mi-NUR-və(English) mee-NEHR-ba(Spanish)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
Mireia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Spanish
Pronounced: mee-REH-yə(Catalan) mee-REH-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Catalan form of Mirèio (see Mireille).
Mirela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Albanian
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Romanian, Croatian and Albanian form of Mireille.
Miriam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: מִרְיָם(Hebrew)
Pronounced: MIR-ee-əm(English) MI-ryam(German) MI-ri-yam(Czech) MEE-ree-am(Slovak)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of Mary. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name (alongside Mary) since the Protestant Reformation.
Mirjam
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch, German, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene
Pronounced: MIR-yam(German) MEER-yahm(Finnish)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Form of Miriam in several languages.
Montserrat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan
Pronounced: moon-sə-RAT
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".
Nadia 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: ناديّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: na-DEE-yah
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic ناديّة (see Nadiyya).
Nahia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: NA-ya
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From Basque nahi meaning "desire, wish".
Naiara
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: nie-A-ra
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the Basque name of the Spanish city of Nájera, which is Arabic in origin. In the 12th century there was a reported apparition of the Virgin Mary in a nearby cave.
Nainsí
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Irish form of Nancy.
Natalya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian
Other Scripts: Наталья(Russian)
Pronounced: nu-TA-lyə
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Russian form of Natalia (see Natalie).
Nefertari
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TAHR-ee(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jrj meaning "the most beautiful". This was the name of an Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the favourite wife of Rameses II.
Nefertiti
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Egyptian
Pronounced: nehf-ər-TEE-tee(English)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From Egyptian nfrt-jjtj meaning "the beautiful one has come". Nefertiti was a powerful Egyptian queen of the New Kingdom, the principal wife of Akhenaton, the pharaoh that briefly imposed a monotheistic religion centered around the sun god Aton.
Nemesis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Νέμεσις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEH-MEH-SEES(Classical Greek) NEHM-ə-sis(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "distribution of what is due, righteous anger" in Greek. In Greek mythology Nemesis was the personification of vengeance and justice.
Nephthys
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Other Scripts: Νέφθυς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Greek form of Egyptian nbt-ḥwt (reconstructed as Nebet-Hut) meaning "lady of the house", derived from nbt "lady" and ḥwt "house". This was the name of an Egyptian goddess associated with the air, death and mourning. She was wife of the desert god Seth.
Nerea
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque, Spanish
Pronounced: neh-REH-a
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Possibly from Basque nere, a dialectal variant of nire meaning "mine". Alternatively, it could be a feminine form of Nereus. This name arose in Basque-speaking regions of Spain in the first half of the 20th century, though it is now popular throughout the country.
Nereida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: neh-RAY-dha
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek Νηρηΐδες (Nereides) meaning "nymphs, sea sprites", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nerida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Indigenous Australian
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "water lily" in an Australian Aboriginal language.
Nerina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Probably from Greek Νηρηΐδες (see Nereida). This name was used by Torquato Tasso for a character in his play Aminta (1573), and subsequently by Giacomo Leopardi in his poem Le Ricordanze (1829).
Nerissa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: nə-RIS-ə(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play The Merchant of Venice (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρηΐς (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god Nereus, who supposedly fathered them.
Nieves
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: NYEH-behs
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "snows" in Spanish, derived from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".
Nino 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ნინო(Georgian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly from a Greek feminine form of Ninos. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a Greek-speaking woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
Núria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Catalan, Portuguese
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From a Catalan title of the Virgin Mary, Nostra Senyora de Núria, meaning "Our Lady of Nuria". Nuria is a sanctuary in Spain in which there is a shrine containing a famous statue of Mary.
Nydia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: NID-ee-ə(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel The Last Days of Pompeii (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
Olga
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Other Scripts: Ольга(Russian, Ukrainian) Олга(Serbian, Bulgarian) Όλγα(Greek)
Pronounced: OL-gə(Russian) AWL-ga(Polish, German) AWL-ka(Icelandic) OL-gaw(Hungarian) OL-gha(Spanish) OL-ga(Czech)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Russian form of the Old Norse name Helga. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, the ruler of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Like her husband she was probably a Varangian, who were Norse people who settled in eastern Europe beginning in the 9th century. Following Igor's death she ruled as regent for her son Svyatoslav for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity, though this goal was only achieved by her grandson Vladimir.
Oriana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: o-RYA-na
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from Latin aurum "gold" or from its derivatives, Spanish oro or French or. In medieval legend Oriana was the daughter of a king of England who married the knight Amadis.
Órlaith
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: OR-la(Irish)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "golden ruler", from Old Irish ór "gold" combined with flaith "ruler, sovereign, princess". This name was borne by several medieval Irish royals, including a sister of the king Brian Boru.
Paloma
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: pa-LO-ma
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Means "dove, pigeon" in Spanish.
Pandora
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Πανδώρα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PAN-DAW-RA(Classical Greek) pan-DAWR-ə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and δῶρον (doron) meaning "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
Parvana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Azerbaijani Pərvanə.
Parvati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: पार्वती(Sanskrit, Hindi)
Pronounced: PAHR-və-tee(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "of the mountains" in Sanskrit. Parvati is a Hindu goddess of love and power, the wife of Shiva and the mother of Ganesha.
Pax
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: PAKS(Latin, English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
Paz 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: PATH(European Spanish) PAS(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".
Perdita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play The Winter's Tale (1610).
Persis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Περσίς(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Greek name meaning "Persian woman". This was the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.
Pierina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: pyeh-REE-na
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine diminutive of Piero.
Rafaela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ra-fa-EH-la(Spanish)
Rating: 75% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Raphael.
Rahela
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Romanian, Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Рахела(Serbian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Romanian, Croatian and Serbian form of Rachel.
Ramona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Romanian, English
Pronounced: ra-MO-na(Spanish) rə-MON-ə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 3 votes
Feminine form of Ramón. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Helen Hunt Jackson's novel Ramona (1884), as well as several subsequent movies based on the book.
Regina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Estonian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ri-JEE-nə(English) ri-JIE-nə(English) reh-GEE-na(German) reh-JEE-na(Italian) reh-KHEE-na(Spanish) ryeh-gyi-NU(Lithuanian) reh-GYEE-na(Polish) REH-gi-na(Czech) REH-gee-naw(Hungarian)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
Róis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Irish form of Rose, or directly from the Irish word rós meaning "rose" (genitive róis; of Latin origin).
Róisín
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ro-SHEEN
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Róis or the Irish word rós meaning "rose" (of Latin origin). It appears in the 17th-century song Róisín Dubh.
Roksana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Polish
Other Scripts: Роксана(Russian)
Pronounced: raw-KSA-na(Polish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Russian and Polish form of Roxana.
Ronalda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: rah-NAWL-da
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Ronald.
Roxana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ῥωξάνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: rahk-SAN-ə(English) rok-SA-na(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Latin form of Ῥωξάνη (Rhoxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak), which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel Roxana (1724).
Roxelana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: History
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From a Turkish nickname meaning "Ruthenian". This referred to the region of Ruthenia, covering Belarus, Ukraine and western Russia. Roxelana (1502-1558), also known by the name Hürrem, was a slave and then concubine of Süleyman the Magnificent, sultan of the Ottoman Empire. She eventually became his wife and produced his heir, Selim II.
Roxy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RAHK-see
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Roxana.
Rubena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: roo-BEH-na
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
From Esperanto rubeno meaning "ruby", ultimately from Latin ruber "red".
Ruqayya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: رقيّة(Arabic)
Pronounced: roo-KIE-yah
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Alternate transcription of Arabic رقيّة (see Ruqayyah).
Sabrina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, French, Spanish
Pronounced: sə-BREEN-ə(English) sa-BREE-na(Italian, Spanish) za-BREE-na(German) SA-BREE-NA(French)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Habren, the original Welsh name of the River Severn. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Sabrina was the name of a princess who was drowned in the Severn. Supposedly the river was named for her, but it is more likely that her name was actually derived from that of the river, which is of unknown meaning. She appears as a water nymph in John Milton's masque Comus (1634).

The name was brought to public attention by Samuel A. Taylor's play Sabrina Fair (1953) and the movie adaptation Sabrina that followed it the next year. This is also the name of a comic book character, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, first introduced 1962 and with television adaptations in 1970-1974 and 1996-2003, both causing minor jumps in popularity. Another jump occurred in 1976, when it was used for a main character on the television series Charlie's Angels.

Safira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: sa-FEE-ra
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
From Esperanto safiro meaning "sapphire".
Saira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Urdu
Other Scripts: سائرہ(Urdu)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "traveller" in Arabic.
Samira 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic, Persian
Other Scripts: سميرة(Arabic) سمیرا(Persian)
Pronounced: sa-MEE-rah(Arabic)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Samir 1.
Sandhya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam
Other Scripts: संध्या(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi) సంధ్యా(Telugu) சந்தியா(Tamil) ಸಂಧ್ಯಾ(Kannada) സന്ധ്യ(Malayalam)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "twilight" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu god Brahma.
Sapphira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: Σαπφείρη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: sə-FIE-rə(English)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Σαπφείρη (Sappheire), which was from Greek σάπφειρος (sappheiros) meaning "sapphire" or "lapis lazuli" (ultimately derived from the Hebrew word סַפִּיר (sappir)). Sapphira is a character in Acts in the New Testament who is killed by God for lying.
Sarai
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Hebrew, Spanish
Other Scripts: שָׂרָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: SEHR-ie(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "my princess" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this was Sarah's name before God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).
Saraswati
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Other Scripts: सरस्वती(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "possessing water" from Sanskrit सरस् (saras) meaning "fluid, water, lake" and वती (vati) meaning "having". This is the name of a Hindu river goddess, also associated with learning and the arts, who is the wife of Brahma.
Saturnina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Roman, Spanish
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-na(Spanish)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Saturninus. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
Savanna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: sə-VAN-ə
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Variant of Savannah.
Séarlait
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHAHR-lat
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Irish form of Charlotte.
Sebastiana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Sebastianus (see Sebastian).
Selena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Селена(Russian) Σελήνη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: seh-LEH-na(Spanish)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Latinized form of Selene. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
Serafina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese (Rare), Polish (Rare)
Pronounced: seh-ra-FEE-na(Spanish, Polish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Polish form of Seraphina.
Seraphina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: sehr-ə-FEEN-ə(English) zeh-ra-FEE-na(German)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each.

This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

Seren
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: SEH-rehn
Rating: 60% based on 3 votes
Means "star" in Welsh. This is a recently created Welsh name.
Serena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Late Roman
Pronounced: sə-REEN-ə(English) seh-REH-na(Italian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
From a Late Latin name that was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem The Faerie Queene (1590). A famous bearer from the modern era is tennis player Serena Williams (1981-).
Severina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: seh-veh-REE-na(Italian)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Severinus.
Shakira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arabic
Other Scripts: شاكرة(Arabic)
Pronounced: SHA-kee-rah
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Shakir. A famous bearer is the Colombian singer Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll (1977-), known simply as Shakira.
Sidonia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman, Georgian
Other Scripts: სიდონია(Georgian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Sidonius. This is the name of a legendary saint from Georgia. She and her father Abiathar were supposedly converted by Saint Nino from Judaism to Christianity.
Sienna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHN-ə
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
From the English word meaning "orange-red". It is ultimately from the name of the city of Siena in Italy, because of the colour of the clay there.
Sierra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: see-EHR-ə
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
Solange
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LAHNZH
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
French form of the Late Latin name Sollemnia, which was derived from Latin sollemnis "religious". This was the name of a French shepherdess who became a saint after she was killed by her master.
Soleil
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
Pronounced: SAW-LAY(French)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "sun" in French. It is not commonly used as a name in France itself.
Solène
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SAW-LEHN
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Solange.
Sólveig
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Norse [1], Icelandic
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Solveig.
Soraya
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Spanish, French, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: ثریا(Persian)
Pronounced: so-ray-YAW(Persian) so-RA-ya(Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Persian form of Thurayya. It became popular in some parts of Europe because of the fame of Princess Soraya (1932-2001), wife of the last Shah of Iran, who became a European socialite.
Sperantia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Latin form of Esperanza.
Sprita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: SPREE-ta
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "witty, lively" in Esperanto, ultimately from Latin spiritus "breath, energy".
Sunita
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Other Scripts: सुनीता(Sanskrit, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "well conducted, wise", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with नीत (nita) meaning "conducted, led". In Hindu legend this is the name of the daughter of King Anga of Bengal.
Sunniva
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
Suri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish
Other Scripts: שרה(Yiddish)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Yiddish form of Sarah.
Svjetlana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Свјетлана(Serbian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Croatian and Serbian form of Svetlana.
Tara 2
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: तारा(Sanskrit, Hindi, Nepali)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "star" in Sanskrit. Tara is the name of a Hindu astral goddess, the wife of Brhaspati. She was abducted by Soma, a god of the moon, leading to a great war that was only ended when Brahma intervened and released her. This is also the name of a Buddhist deity (a female Buddha).
Tarja
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: TAHR-yah
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Finnish form of Daria.
Teresa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Catalan, Polish, Lithuanian, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Pronounced: teh-REH-sa(Spanish, Polish) teh-REH-za(Italian, German) tə-REH-zə(Catalan) tyeh-ryeh-SU(Lithuanian) TEH-reh-sah(Finnish) tə-REE-sə(English) tə-REE-zə(English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Form of Theresa used in several languages. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the Albanian missionary Saint Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), better known as Mother Teresa, who worked with the poor in India. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse of Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
Tereza
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Croatian, Serbian, Portuguese (Brazilian), Romanian
Other Scripts: Тереза(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Pronounced: TEH-reh-za(Czech) teh-REHZ-a(Romanian)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Form of Theresa in various languages.
Teuta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Albanian
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from an Illyrian word or title meaning "queen". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Illyrian queen.
Titania
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: tie-TAY-nee-ə(American English) ti-TAH-nee-ə(British English)
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy A Midsummer Night's Dream (1595) where it is the name of the queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
Tiziana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: teet-TSYA-na
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Tiziano.
Topaz
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: TO-paz
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the yellow precious stone, the traditional birthstone of November, ultimately derived from Greek τόπαζος (topazos).
Valdís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Norse [1], Icelandic
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from Old Norse valr meaning "the dead, the slain" and dís meaning "goddess".
Vedrana
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Ведрана(Serbian)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Vedran.
Verena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Late Roman
Pronounced: veh-REH-na(German)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Possibly related to Latin verus "true". This might also be a Coptic form of the Ptolemaic name Berenice. Saint Verena was a 3rd-century Egyptian-born nurse who went with the Theban Legion to Switzerland. After the legion was massacred she settled near Zurich.
Viatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Earlier form of Beatrix.
Vitalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Vitale.
Winter
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: WIN-tər
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.
Xavia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Modern feminine form of Xavier.
Zaira
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Spanish
Pronounced: DZIE-ra(Italian) THIE-ra(European Spanish) SIE-ra(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Zaïre. It was used by Vincenzo Bellini for the heroine of his opera Zaira (1829), which was based on Voltaire's 1732 play Zaïre.
Zenaida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Late Greek
Other Scripts: Ζηναΐδα(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Apparently a Greek derivative of Ζηναΐς (Zenais), which was derived from the name of the Greek god Zeus. This was the name of a 1st-century saint who was a doctor with her sister Philonella.
Zinaida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Зинаида(Russian) Зінаіда(Belarusian) Зінаїда(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: zyi-nu-EE-də(Russian)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Russian, Belarusian and Ukrainian form of Zenaida.
Zoraida
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: tho-RIE-dha(European Spanish) so-RIE-dha(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Perhaps means "enchanting" or "dawn" in Arabic. This was the name of a minor 12th-century Spanish saint, a convert from Islam. The name was used by Cervantes for a character in his novel Don Quixote (1606), in which Zoraida is a beautiful Moorish woman of Algiers who converts to Christianity and elopes with a Spanish officer.
Alix
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LEEKS
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
Medieval French variant of Alice, also sometimes used as a masculine name. This is the name of the hero (a young Gaulish man) of a French comic book series, which debuted in 1948.
Céleste
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: SEH-LEST
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
French feminine and masculine form of Caelestis.
Charis
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Greek
Other Scripts: Χάρις(Ancient Greek) Χάρης, Χάρις(Greek)
Pronounced: KA-REES(Classical Greek) KHA-rees(Greek)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Ancient Greek feminine form of Chares. This was the word (in the singular) for one of the three Graces (plural Χάριτες).

This is also a Modern Greek transcription of the masculine form Chares.

Ciel
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Various
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "sky" in French. It is not used as a given name in France itself.
Indigo
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: IN-di-go
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the English word indigo for the purplish-blue dye or the colour. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ἰνδικὸν (Indikon) meaning "Indic, from India".
Izar
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ee-SAR
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "star" in Basque.
Leilani
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hawaiian
Pronounced: lay-LA-nee
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Means "heavenly flowers" or "royal child" from Hawaiian lei "flowers, lei, child" and lani "heaven, sky, royal, majesty".
Padma
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Tamil, Kannada, Telugu
Other Scripts: पद्म, पद्मा(Sanskrit, Hindi) பத்மா(Tamil) ಪದ್ಮಾ(Kannada) పద్మా(Telugu)
Pronounced: pəd-MAH(Hindi)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "lotus" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the feminine form पद्मा and the masculine form पद्म. According to Hindu tradition a lotus holding the god Brahma arose from the navel of the god Vishnu. The name Padma is used in Hindu texts to refer to several characters, including the goddess Lakshmi and the hero Rama.
Rajani
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali
Other Scripts: रजनी(Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali) రజని(Telugu) ರಜನಿ(Kannada)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "the dark one" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Kali or Durga.
Shakti
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Other Scripts: शक्ति(Sanskrit, Hindi)
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Means "power" in Sanskrit. In Hinduism a shakti is the female counterpart of a god. The name Shakti is used in particular to refer to the female counterpart of Shiva, also known as Parvati among many other names.
Trinidad
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: tree-nee-DHADH
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Means "trinity" in Spanish, referring to the Holy Trinity. An island in the West Indies bears this name.
Achille
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Italian
Pronounced: A-SHEEL(French) a-KEEL-leh(Italian)
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
French and Italian form of Achilles.
Adonai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Theology
Other Scripts: אֲדֹנָי(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 16% based on 5 votes
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
Adrastos
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἄδραστος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-DRAS-TOS(Classical Greek)
Rating: 60% based on 4 votes
Means "not inclined to run away" in Greek. This was the name of a king of Argos in Greek legend.
Áedán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Irish [1]
Rating: 53% based on 4 votes
Old Irish form of Aodhán.
Aeolus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Αἴολος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: EE-ə-ləs(English) ee-O-ləs(English)
Rating: 45% based on 4 votes
Latinized form of Aiolos.
Alaric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Germanic
Pronounced: AL-ə-rik(English)
Rating: 70% based on 4 votes
From the Gothic name Alareiks, which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
Alastar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: A-lə-stər
Rating: 65% based on 4 votes
Irish form of Alexander.
Aridai
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: אֲרִידַי(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
Meaning unknown, possibly of Persian origin. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the ten sons of Haman killed by the Jews.
Arvid
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Pronounced: AR-vid(Swedish)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
Astor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: AS-tər
Rating: 50% based on 3 votes
From a German and French surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk". The wealthy and influential Astor family, prominent in British and American society, originated in the Italian Alps.
Aurélien
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: O-REH-LYEHN
Rating: 100% based on 2 votes
French form of Aurelianus.
Avedis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Ավետիս(Armenian)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Western Armenian transcription of Avetis.
Axel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German, French, English
Pronounced: A-ksehl(Swedish) A-ksəl(German) A-KSEHL(French) AK-səl(English)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Medieval Danish form of Absalom.
Azrael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Variant of Azriel. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
Caedmon
Gender: Masculine
Usage: History (Ecclesiastical)
Pronounced: KAD-mən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Meaning unknown, though the first element is likely connected to Brythonic kad meaning "battle". Saint Caedmon was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon poet who supposedly received his poetic inspiration from a dream. Our only knowledge of him is through the 8th-century writings of the historian Bede.
Cáel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From Old Irish cáel meaning "slender". In Irish legend Cáel was a warrior of the Fianna and the lover of Créd.
Cailean
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish Gaelic [1]
Pronounced: KA-lehn
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Means "whelp, young dog" in Scottish Gaelic. This name was borne by Cailean Mór, a 13th-century Scottish lord and ancestor of Clan Campbell.
Caleb
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Biblical
Other Scripts: כָּלֵב(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: KAY-ləb(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) meaning "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) meaning "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Canaan. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

Castor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Κάστωρ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAS-tər(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
From the Greek name Κάστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κέκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κέκαστο). Alternatively it could be derived from the Greek word κάστωρ (kastor) meaning "beaver", though the legends about Castor do not mention beavers, which were foreign animals to the Greeks. In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
Celio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Pronounced: CHEH-lyo(Italian) THEHL-yo(European Spanish) SEHL-yo(Latin American Spanish)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Italian and Spanish form of Caelius.
Ciarán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: KYEE-ran(Irish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Ciar. This was the name of two 6th-century Irish saints: Ciarán the Elder, the founder of the monastery at Saighir, and Ciarán the Younger, the founder of the monastery at Clonmacnoise.
Corin
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French (Rare)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
French form of Quirinus.
Cristián
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: krees-TYAN
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Christian.
Cyrano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: SIR-ə-no(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Possibly derived from the name of the ancient Greek city of Cyrene, which was located in North Africa. Edmond Rostand used this name in his play Cyrano de Bergerac (1897). He based his character upon a real person, Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, a French satirist of the 17th century.
Dario
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Croatian
Pronounced: DA-ryo(Italian) DA-ree-o(Croatian)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Darius.
David
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: דָּוִד(Hebrew) Давид(Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)
Pronounced: DAY-vid(English) da-VEED(Hebrew, Brazilian Portuguese) DA-VEED(French) da-BEEDH(Spanish) du-VEED(European Portuguese) də-BEET(Catalan) DA-vit(German, Czech) DAH-vid(Swedish, Norwegian) DAH-vit(Dutch) du-VYEET(Russian)
Rating: 80% based on 2 votes
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Over the last century it has been one of the English-speaking world's most consistently popular names, never leaving the top 30 names for boys in the United States, and reaching the top rank in England and Wales during the 1950s and 60s. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys during the 1970s and 80s.

Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873), musician David Bowie (1947-2016), and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel David Copperfield (1850).

Devereux
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: DEHV-ə-roo
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
From an English surname, of Norman French origin, meaning "from Evreux". Evreux is a town in France.
Diego
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: DYEH-gho
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Possibly a shortened form of Santiago. In medieval records Diego was Latinized as Didacus, and it has been suggested that it in fact derives from Greek διδαχή (didache) meaning "teaching". Saint Didacus (or Diego) was a 15th-century Franciscan brother based in Alcalá, Spain. Other famous bearers of this name include Mexican muralist Diego Rivera (1886-1957) and Argentine soccer player Diego Maradona (1960-).
Elric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval English
Pronounced: EHL-rik(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Middle English form of either of the Old English names Ælfric or Æðelric. Both were rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
Émeric
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EHM-REEK
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
French form of Emmerich.
Evander 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Other Scripts: Εὔανδρος(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ee-VAN-dər(English) ə-VAN-dər(English)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Εὔανδρος (Euandros) meaning "good of man", derived from εὖ (eu) meaning "good" and ἀνήρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ἀνδρός). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
Ezio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: EHT-tsyo
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Aetius.
Félix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: FEH-LEEKS(French) FEH-leeks(Spanish, Portuguese)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of Felix.
Gabriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: გაბრიელ(Georgian) גַּבְרִיאֵל(Ancient Hebrew) Γαβριήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GA-BREE-YEHL(French) ga-BRYEHL(Spanish) ga-bree-EHL(European Portuguese, Romanian) ga-bree-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) GA-bree-ehl(German, Slovak, Latin) GAH-bri-ehl(Swedish) GAHB-ree-ehl(Finnish) gə-bree-EHL(Catalan) GAY-bree-əl(English) GAB-ryehl(Polish) GA-bri-yehl(Czech)
Rating: 87% based on 3 votes
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.

This name has been used occasionally in England since the 12th century. It was not common in the English-speaking world until the end of the 20th century.

Gavriel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: גַּבְרִיאֵל(Hebrew)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Hebrew form of Gabriel.
Gualtiero
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: gwal-TYEH-ro
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Italian form of Walter.
Isidro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ee-SEE-dhro
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Spanish variant of Isidore.
Ismael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Ἰσμαήλ(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: eez-ma-EHL(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ishmael. This is also the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
Jack
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAK
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of John [1]. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name Jacques [2]. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.

American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by the actor Jack Nicholson (1937-) and the golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940-). Apart from Nicklaus, none of these famous bearers were given the name Jack at birth.

In the United Kingdom this form has been bestowed more frequently than John since the 1990s, being the most popular name for boys from 1996 to 2008.

Jair
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical, Biblical Portuguese, Spanish (Latin American), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Other Scripts: יָאִיר(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: JAY-ər(English) KHIER(Spanish) zha-EER(Portuguese)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Means "he shines" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a son of Manasseh and one of the ruling judges of the Israelites.
Jarvis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAHR-vis
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Gervais.
Jimi
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Finnish (Modern)
Pronounced: JIM-ee(English)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Jimmy. A famous bearer was the rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
Jorge
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: KHOR-kheh(Spanish) ZHAWR-zhi(European Portuguese) ZHAWR-zhee(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of George.
Julian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English, Polish, German
Pronounced: JOO-lee-ən(English) JOOL-yən(English) YOO-lyan(Polish, German)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from Julius. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
Kallias
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Καλλίας(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek κάλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty". This was the name of an Athenian who fought at Marathon who later became an ambassador to the Persians.
Kieron
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: KEER-ən(English) KEER-awn(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Lachlan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: LAKH-lən(Scottish) LAK-lən(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Lachlann, the Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Leandro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Pronounced: leh-AN-dro(Spanish)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of Leander.
Mariano
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ma-RYA-no(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Marianus. It is also used as a masculine form of Maria.
Martzel
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Marcellus.
Mauro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: MOW-ro(Italian, Spanish)
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Maurus.
Mercury
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Pronounced: MURK-yə-ree(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system and a metallic chemical element, both named for the god.
Natanael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: na-ta-na-EHL(Spanish)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Nathanael.
Nereus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Νηρεύς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: NEH-REWS(Classical Greek) NIR-ee-əs(English)
Rating: 60% based on 2 votes
Derived from Greek νηρός (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
Nerio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Possibly a variant of Nereo.
Nero 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Ancient Roman
Pronounced: NIR-o(English)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Roman cognomen, which was probably of Sabine origin meaning "strong, vigorous". It was used by a prominent branch of the gens Claudia starting from the 3rd century BC. It was borne most famously by a Roman emperor of the 1st century, remembered as a tyrant. His birth name was Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, but after he was adopted as the heir of Claudius his name became Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus.
Nevio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: NEH-vyo
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Italian form of the Roman family name Naevius, which was derived from Latin naevus "mole (on the body)". A famous bearer was the 3rd-century BC Roman poet Gnaeus Naevius.
Ognjen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Огњен(Serbian)
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Croatian and Serbian form of Ognyan.
Orion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ὠρίων(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AW-REE-AWN(Classical Greek) o-RIE-ən(English)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Meaning uncertain, but possibly related to Greek ὅριον (horion) meaning "boundary, limit". Alternatively it may be derived from Akkadian Uru-anna meaning "light of the heavens". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter who was killed by a scorpion sent by the earth goddess Gaia.
Pace
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: PAYS
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From an English surname that was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
Pèire
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Occitan
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Occitan form of Peter.
Plamen
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Bulgarian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Пламен(Bulgarian, Serbian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Derived from South Slavic plamen meaning "flame, fire".
Rafael
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, German, Hungarian, Romanian, Slovene, Hebrew
Other Scripts: רָפָאֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: ra-fa-EHL(Spanish, European Portuguese) ha-fa-EW(Brazilian Portuguese) RA-fa-ehl(German) RAW-faw-ehl(Hungarian)
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Form of Raphael in various languages. A famous bearer is the Spanish tennis player Rafael Nadal (1986-).
Ramiro
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese
Pronounced: ra-MEE-ro(Spanish) ra-MEE-roo(European Portuguese) ha-MEE-roo(Brazilian Portuguese)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Spanish and Portuguese form of Ramirus, a Latinized form of a Visigothic name derived from the Germanic elements ragin "advice" and mari "famous". Saint Ramirus was a 6th-century prior of the Saint Claudius Monastery in Leon. He and several others were executed by the Arian Visigoths, who opposed orthodox Christianity. This name was subsequently borne by kings of León, Asturias and Aragon.
Riordan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English (Rare)
Rating: 90% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname (Anglicized from Irish Gaelic Ó Ríoghbhárdáin), which was derived from the given name Rígbarddán.
Roman
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
Other Scripts: Роман(Russian, Ukrainian)
Pronounced: ru-MAN(Russian) RAWN-man(Polish) RO-man(Czech, German) RAW-man(Slovak) RO-mən(English)
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
Rosaire
Gender: Masculine
Usage: French
Pronounced: RO-ZEHR
Rating: 55% based on 2 votes
Means "rosary" in French.
Salvador
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan
Pronounced: sal-ba-DHOR(Spanish) səl-bə-DHO(Catalan)
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan form of the Late Latin name Salvator, which meant "saviour", referring to Jesus. A famous bearer of this name was the Spanish surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (1904-1989).
Sandalio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: san-DA-lyo
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Sandalius, a Latinized form of the Gothic name Sandulf meaning "true wolf", derived from sand "true" and ulf "wolf". This was the name of a 9th-century Spanish saint martyred by the Moors.
Saturnino
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Spanish, Italian (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Pronounced: sa-toor-NEE-no(Spanish, Italian)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Saturninus.
Slobodan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Serbian, Macedonian, Croatian
Other Scripts: Слободан(Serbian, Macedonian)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
From South Slavic sloboda meaning "freedom".
Somerled
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Old Norse (Anglicized)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Sumarliði meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Norse-Gaelic king of Mann and the Scottish Isles.
Tafari
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Eastern African (Rare), Amharic (Rare)
Other Scripts: ተፈሪ(Amharic)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Possibly means "he who inspires awe" in Amharic. This name was borne by Lij Tafari Makonnen (1892-1975), also known as Haile Selassie, the last emperor of Ethiopia. Rastafarians (Ras Tafari meaning "king Tafari") revere him as the earthly incarnation of God.
Thanasis
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Θανάσης(Greek)
Rating: 95% based on 2 votes
Modern Greek short form of Athanasios.
Thorbjörn
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Swedish
Rating: 85% based on 2 votes
Variant of Torbjörn.
Viator
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Late Roman
Rating: 70% based on 2 votes
Late Latin name (see Beatrix). This was the name of a 4th-century Italian saint.
Zorion
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "happiness" in Basque.
Alexis
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: French, English, Greek, Spanish, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αλέξης(Greek) Ἄλεξις(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: A-LEHK-SEE(French) ə-LEHK-sis(English)
Rating: 50% based on 5 votes
From the Greek name Ἄλεξις (Alexis) meaning "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek ἀλέξω (alexo) meaning "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Ἀλέξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
Aquila
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: AK-wil-ə(English) ə-KWIL-ə(English)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
Arden
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AHR-dən
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".
Arya 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Persian, Indian, Hindi, Malayalam
Other Scripts: آریا(Persian) आर्य, आर्या(Hindi) ആര്യ, ആര്യാ(Malayalam)
Pronounced: aw-ree-YAW(Persian)
Rating: 80% based on 3 votes
From an old Indo-Iranian root meaning "Aryan, noble". In India, this is a transcription of both the masculine form आर्य and the feminine form आर्या. In Iran it is only a masculine name.
Columba
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Late Roman
Pronounced: ko-LOOM-ba(Late Latin) kə-LUM-bə(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
Izzy
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: IZ-ee
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Isidore, Isabel, Israel and other names beginning with a similar sound.
Jordan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English, French, Macedonian, Serbian
Other Scripts: Јордан(Macedonian, Serbian)
Pronounced: JAWR-dən(English) ZHAWR-DAHNN(French)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
From the name of the river that flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name Jordanes, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.

This name died out after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In America and other countries it became fairly popular in the second half of the 20th century. A famous bearer of the surname is former basketball star Michael Jordan (1963-).

Phoenix
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: FEE-niks
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
Rio 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
Rowan
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: RO-ən(English)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of the Irish name Ruadhán. As an English name, it can also be derived from the surname Rowan, itself derived from the Irish given name. It could also be given in reference to the rowan tree, a word of Old Norse origin (coincidentally sharing the same Indo-European root meaning "red" with the Irish name).
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